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hopkinsbreastcenter.org - ARTEMIS - May 02, 2006

The racial disparity in breast cancer prognosis and survival may have more to do with socioeconomic status, rather than biological factors, according to a study of women diagnosed and treated at a public hospital. The results were presented at the annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Though the population sample was relatively small, including 341 African-American and 94 white women, the results suggest that low economic standing contributes to similarly poor prognostic profiles for tumor grade and estrogen receptor status in both races, according to the researchers ...continue reading "Underserved African-American and White Women with Breast Cancer Have Similar Prognostic Profiles for Estrogen Receptor and Tumor Grade"

At a time when blacks share a disproportionate share of the nation's cancer burden, new research presented here suggests that poverty and genetics may be at least partly to blame.

"These studies dispel the myth that it's all about race," says Lucile L. Adams-Campbell, PhD, director of the Howard University Cancer Center in Washington. "Health disparities go beyond color and ethnicity."

"African-American women are more commonly poor and uninsured, so some studies suggest socioeconomic status, not race, is associated with a poor prognostic profile," says researcher Keith A. Dookeran, MBBS, of Stroger Hospital of Cook County in Illinois.

...continue reading "Poverty, genetics linked to cancer risks in blacks"

We are happy to share great news - our MBCCOP receives NSABP award for outstanding overall performance in STAR P2!

SHCC MBCCOP receives NSABP award for outstanding overall performance in STAR P2!
SHCC MBCCOP receives NSABP award for outstanding overall performance in STAR P2! - Click to Enlarge

We thank all investigators and CRAs for their hard work!